Last edited by Goramar
Tuesday, July 7, 2020 | History

5 edition of Marine Hydrothermal Systems and the Origin of Life found in the catalog.

Marine Hydrothermal Systems and the Origin of Life

Report of Working Group 91

by N.G. Holm

  • 116 Want to read
  • 23 Currently reading

Published by Springer .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Evolution,
  • Geochemistry,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Life,
  • Hydrographic Biology,
  • Origin Of Life,
  • Science,
  • Life Sciences - Ecology,
  • Earth Sciences - Geology,
  • Earth Sciences - Oceanography,
  • Science / Ecology,
  • Science / Geology,
  • Science-Earth Sciences - Geology,
  • Science-Earth Sciences - Oceanography,
  • Congresses,
  • Hydrothermal vent ecology,
  • Hydrothermal vents,
  • Origin

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages260
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL7807053M
    ISBN 100792320182
    ISBN 109780792320180

      “There’s a long-standing hypothesis that the origin of life may be in hydrothermal environments, and these vent deposits were certainly very promising to search for signs of early life. A hydrothermal vent is a fissure on the seafloor from which geothermally heated water issues. Hydrothermal vents are commonly found near volcanically active places, areas where tectonic plates are moving apart at spreading centers, ocean basins, and hotspots. Hydrothermal deposits are rocks and mineral ore deposits formed by the action of hydrothermal vents.

    Astrobiologist Laurie Barge and her team at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California, are working to recognize life on other planets by studying the origins of life here on Earth. Their research focuses on how the building blocks of life form in hydrothermal vents on the ocean floor.   Submarine hydrothermal vents were first proposed as a possible location for the origin and early evolution of life by Baross and Hoffman () on the grounds that physical and chemical gradients in hydrothermal systems “provided the necessary multiple pathways for the abiotic synthesis of chemical compounds, origin and evolution of.

      Chemical environments in submarine hydrothermal systems. In: Holm NG, editor. Marine Hydrothermal Systems and the Origin of Life. Springer; Dordrecht, The Netherlands: pp. 67– 5. Shock EL, Schulte MD. Organic synthesis during fluid mixing in hydrothermal systems. J.   What is Life at Vents and Seeps? Hydrothermal vents and cold seeps are places where chemical-rich fluids emanate from the seafloor, often providing the energy to sustain lush communities of life in some very harsh environments. Cold seeps and hydrothermal vents differ from one another in the underlying conditions that form and drive them.


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Marine Hydrothermal Systems and the Origin of Life by N.G. Holm Download PDF EPUB FB2

About this book Research of the origins of life in connection with a marine environment started at the end of the seventies, when the `black smokers' in the Pacific were discovered and the Red Sea deep hydrothermal brines were found to be a fruitful environment for abiotic synthesis of life precursors.

About this book Introduction Research of the origins of life in connection with a marine environment started at the end of the seventies, when the `black smokers' in the Pacific were discovered and the Red Sea deep hydrothermal brines were found to be a fruitful. (source: Nielsen Book Data) Summary Research of the origins of life in connection with a marine environment started at the end of the seventies, when the "black smokers" in the Pacific were discovered and the Red Sea deep hydrothermal brines were found to be a fruitful environment for abiotic synthesis of life precursors.

Marine hydrothermal systems and the origin of life: future research. Origins of life and evolution of the biosphere: the journal of the International Society for the Cited by: Summary: Research of the origins of life in connection with a marine environment started at the end of the seventies, when the `black smokers' in the Pacific were discovered and the Red Sea deep hydrothermal brines were found to be a fruitful environment for abiotic synthesis of life precursors.

Hydrothermal ecosystems can be expected to have existed on Earth since life arose. A hyperthermophilic lifestyle has been proposed for the common ancestor of life and submarine hydrothermal vents are a candidate site for the origin of s: 1.

Submarine hydrothermal vents are geochemically reactive habitats that harbour rich microbial communities. There are striking parallels between the chemistry of the H2–CO2 redox couple that is present in hydrothermal systems and the core energy metabolic reactions of some modern prokaryotic autotrophs.

The biochemistry of these autotrophs might, in turn, harbour clues about the kinds of. Hydrothermal vents and the origin of life. systems is based on rese arch into only one system: show that the marine consortia represent a sy ntrophic. It was then supported by Holm, Simoneit and Shock between and In a new type of hydrothermal systems, named ultramafic- hosted, was discovered and relaunched the question of the origin of life.

Their specificity is the occurrence of mantle outcroppings. The naturally chemiosmotic nature of alkaline hydrothermal systems, such as Lost City, might be important to the origin of life issue, but in a somewhat unexpected way that, in turn, helps to.

Investigating hydrothermal vents, geochemist Frieder Klein from Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in the US has discovered a variation on the deep sea origin story. He has found evidence. But despite their intimidating description, hydrothermal vents support a wide variety of marine life, including fish, tubeworms, clams, mussels, crabs, and shrimp.

Hundreds of species of animals have been identified in the hydrothermal vent habitats around the world. The spectacular nature of marine hydrothermal systems with features such as ‘black smokers’, ‘white smokers’ and peculiar ecosystems that are independent of sunlight as a source of reducing power has focused much interest on hydrothermal processes for the explanation of an array of geochemical processes and phenomena.

Primitive pumps that maintained the internal environment of primitive proto-cells may have allowed the earliest life forms to leave deep-sea hydrothermal vents for Earth's early oceans. It follows that hydrothermal systems may be the most favourable environments for life on Earth. This fact makes hydrothermal systems logical candidates for the location of the emergence of life, a speculation that is supported by genetic evidence that modern hyperthermophilic organisms are closer to a common ancestor than any other forms of life.

Life (ISSN ; CODEN: LBSIB7) is an international peer-reviewed open access journal of scientific studies related to fundamental themes in life sciences, published monthly online by MDPI.

The Astrobiology Society of Britain (ASB) is affiliated with Life and their members receive a discount on the article processing charges. Open Access —free for readers, with article processing. In contrast to the heterotrophic hypothesis of the origin of life, with its nourishing ‘organic soup’, the vent theory suggests that the earliest life was chemosynthetic, taking biochemical advantage of the large degree of chemical disequilibrium associated with mixing zones of low- and high-temperature portions of hydrothermal systems.

Hydrothermal Systems and the Origin of Life Earth's Early Environment Evolution of Hydrothermal Systems Heterotrophic versus Chemosynthetic Hypotheses for the Origin of Life Evidence for Thermophilic, Autotrophic Ancestors Wdchterhiiuser's Outline for the Origin and Evolution of Life The earliest known life-formson Earthare putative fossilized microorganisms, found in hydrothermal vent precipitates, that may have lived as early as Gya, relatively soon after the oceansformed Gya, and not long after the formation of the Earth Gya.

[1][2] In evolutionary biology, abiogenesis, or informally the origin of life,[3][4][5][a]is the naturalprocess by which lifehas arisen from non-living. Recent studies based on sets of genes that were likely to have been present within the first living cells trace the origin of life back to deep-sea hydrothermal.

An understanding of hydrothermal systems (e.g., Lowell, ) can yield important information on how groundwater–surface-water interactions influence emergent biological patterns on regional spatial scales (Pringle et al., ). Convective hydrothermal systems require a heat source and a groundwater circulation system.conclude with a discussion of specific hypotheses, related to the origin of life, which can be tested in present-day, submarine hydrothermal environments.

2. Hydrothermal Systems and the Archean Ocean It has become increasingly apparent that the oldest sediments on Earth are marine and.Search the world's most comprehensive index of full-text books. My library.